Grin And Beer It? The Dental Dangers Of Drinking Too Much Beer

Most people already understand that drinking an excessive amount of alcohol is bad for their health. However, some may not realize that certain alcoholic beverage can be hazardous to your mouth, teeth, and gums, too. Beer is considered the most popular alcoholic drink in the United States. If you are part of this group of beer drinkers, understanding how this beverage affects your oral health is smart. This guide will educate you on the dental dangers of drinking beer. Read More 

Why You Shouldn’t Wait To Have Your Broken Tooth Repaired

If you have broken a tooth, you might think that you can wait until regular business hours to see a dentist about the problem. However, it's important not to wait to have a broken tooth repaired. Instead, you should see an emergency dentist as soon as possible. These are a few reasons why it's not a good idea to wait to have your broken tooth repaired. It Can Be Painful  Read More 

Is In-Office Teeth Whitening Right For You?

Teeth whitening is one of the most popular cosmetic procedures out thereā€”and for good reason. You are able to improve your appearance without invasive surgery. Some in-office treatments are as little as $300, which is reasonably priced compared to other cosmetic procedures. There are minimal risks, and the results can last a very long time. Before you invest in in-office whitening, you need to ask yourself a few questions to make sure this procedure is right for you. Read More 

Reasons To Get Your Wisdom Teeth Removed

If your dentist tells you that you should have your wisdom teeth extracted, the first thought you might have is whether this is really necessary. Wisdom teeth do not always need to be extracted, but most dentists recommend removing them to avoid problems in the future. If your dentist recommends this procedure, there are probably reasons for it, and here are some of the reasons you should get your wisdom teeth removed if your dentist recommends it. Read More 

3 Ways Osteoporosis Can Be Detected From Your Mouth

While your physician can diagnose osteoporosis through bone density testing, X-rays, and a physical examination, your dentist may see signs of this degenerative disorder long before you develop other symptoms. Osteoporosis can develop in both men and women, however, it is most common in women who are nearing menopause. Here are some signs that your family dentist might observe during an oral examination that may lead to the diagnosis of osteoporosis: Read More